2013 Archived Content
 

Oncology Stream

3rd Annual
Antibodies for Cancer Therapy

Challenging the Current Treatment Paradigm

April 29-30, 2013

This conference focuses on the current status of therapeutic antibodies and the outlook for the future. This year's agenda will highlight diverse topics such as identifying and validating novel targets, optimizing drug-like properties, increasing tumor penetration, employing novel constructs, and regulating novel therapeutic antibodies. Emphasis will be placed on learning from molecules in clinical development. Plan to attend to review the vibrant community of therapeutic antibodies and discover the latest trends for future best-in-class drugs.

Scientific Advisory Board

Soldano Ferrone, M.D., Ph.D., Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital
Mitchell Ho, Ph.D., Head, Antibody Therapy Section, Laboratory of Molecular Biology, National Cancer Institute, NIH
Horacio G. Nastri, Ph.D., Director Biotherapeutics, Center for Therapeutic Innovation (CTI), Pfizer, Inc.

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MONDAY, APRIL 29

7:00 am Conference Registration and Morning Coffee


Novel Constructs 

8:30 Chairperson's Opening Remarks

Horacio G. Nastri, Ph.D., Director Biotherapeutics, Center for Therapeutic Innovation (CTI), Pfizer, Inc.

8:40 Design Considerations for Development of an Optimal Antibody-Drug Conjugate

Kenneth Geles, Ph.D., Senior Principal Scientist, Oncology Research Unit, Pfizer, Inc.

Key considerations in generating an optimal ADC include target biology, antibody properties, linker chemistry and payload characteristics. This presentation will use case studies to elaborate on the multifaceted optimization required to yield a viable clinical candidate ADC. ADCs employing different mechanism of action (MOA) payloads will be used as examples to illustrate the need to match target biology with MOA of payload.

9:10 Multivalent Antibody-TRAIL Fusion Proteins for Cancer Therapy

Roland KontermannRoland Kontermann, Ph.D., Professor, Biomedical Engineering, Institute of Cell Biology and Immunology, University of Stuttgart

Our results show that targeting and controlled dimerization of scTRAIL (single-chain derivatives of TRAIL) fusion proteins provides a strategy to enforce apoptosis induction, together with retained tumor selectivity and good in vivo tolerance. The modular nature of the fusion proteins also allows us to adapt this approach for a broad range of tumors for which selective cell surface markers are known.

9:40 Bispecific Antibodies for Selective Inhibition of CD47 in Cancer Cells

Krzysztof MasternakKrzysztof Masternak, Ph.D., Head, Biology, Research, Novimmune

This talk will present the generation of CD47-neutralizing bispecific antibodies, composed of a CD47-specific arm and a targeting arm, specific to a tumor associated antigen (TAA). These antibodies preferentially neutralize CD47 on TAA-expressing cancer cells and should therefore show better pharmacological properties and a broader therapeutic window as compared to non-targeted anti-CD47 monoclonal antibodies.

10:10 Grand Opening Coffee Break in Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing


Intracellular and Membrane Targeting 

11:10 Is Pancreatic Cancer Still Untouchable in this Golden Age of Antibody Therapeutics?

Lei Zheng, M.D., Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Oncology and Surgery, Gastrointestinal Oncology Program, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Rapid developments in antibody target discovery and human monoclonal antibody production has revolutionized cancer therapy. Currently, about one therapeutic antibody is approved each year for cancer treatment; however, there has been little progress in the development of targeted therapies for pancreatic cancer. This talk will discuss the challenges of developing antibody-based therapy for pancreatic cancer, the needs of new treatment strategies for pancreatic cancer, and the current progresses in discovering novel antibody targets for treating this challenging disease.

11:40 Targeting Intracellular Oncoproteins with Antibody Therapy or Vaccination

Qi ZengQi Zeng, Ph.D., Principal Investigator, Institute of Molecular and Cell  Biology, A*STAR Singapore

Antibody-based therapies have better specificity and thus improved efficacy over standard chemotherapy regimens, which result in extended survival and improved quality of life for cancer patients. Our in vivo data suggest that immunotherapies can target not only extracellular but also intracellular oncoproteins.

Vivalis12:10 pm High-Throughput Discovery of Rare Native Human Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibodies from Human Donors

Majid Mehtali, Ph.D., Managing Director & CSO, VIVALIS

VIVA|SCREEN is a microarray-based single cell screening technology for the rapid automated isolation from human healthy donors and patients of rare native therapeutic mAbs. The technology was successfully applied for a series of infectious and autologous targets. It allowed the discovery of a large number of highly potent native human antibodies displaying affinities to the targets in the picoMolar range, including antibodies produced by B cells present at frequencies <1/100,000,000 PBMCs. Examples of mAbs discovery programs will be presented.

12:40 Luncheon Presentations (Sponsorship Opportunities Available) or Lunch on Your Own


Antibodies in the Clinic 

2:00 Chairperson's Remarks

Soldano Ferrone, M.D., Ph.D., Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital

2:05 Antibody Therapies: From Concept to Clinical Trial

Andrew ScottAndrew Scott, M.D., FRACP, Lab Head, Tumor Targeting Lab, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Australia

Antibody based therapeutics have emerged as one of the most successful new strategies for treating patients with cancer over the last 15 years. This presentation will review recent progress in bringing new antibody therapies from concept, to preclinical studies, and into human clinical trials.

2:35 Antibody Based Immunotherapy Targeting GD2

Nai-Kong V. CheungNai-Kong V. Cheung, M.D., Ph.D., Head, Neuroblastoma Program; Enid A. Haupt Chair in Pediatric Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

Antibody based immunotherapy targeting GD2 has proven efficacy for high risk patients with neuroblastoma. Novel strategies and next generation antibodies are rapidly moving along the paths for clinical development, offering options with curative potentials for patients in the coming decade.

3:05 CTLA-4 Blockade: Past, Present, and Future

Michael PostowMichael Postow, M.D., Medical Oncology Fellow, Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

This presentation will summarize the proof of concept basic science discoveries and tell the clinical development history of the FDA approved novel immunotherapy, ipilimumab. I will share the experiences of our group analyzing biomarkers associated with clinical benefit and introduce ways the field is moving forward to understand new ways of applying this immunotherapy.

3:35 PD-1 Blockade in Cancer Therapy

Antoni RibasAntoni Ribas, M.D., Ph.D., Professor, Medicine, Division of Hematology & Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles

Monoclonal antibodies blocking PD-1 or PD-L1 inhibit a major pathway used by cancers to avoid immune attack. Their administration to patients is resulting in objective and durable tumor responses in patients with several cancers, including melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer and renal cell carcinoma.

4:05 Refreshment Break in the Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing

4:45 Problem Solving Breakout Discussions

Concurrent problem solving breakout discussions, open to all attendees, speakers, sponsors, and exhibitors, provide a forum for discussing key issues and meeting potential collaborators. Plan to take part and explore these topics in-depth. Please pick a topic of your choice, find your table and join in.

TABLE: Antibody Therapies: From Concept to Clinical Trial

Moderator: Andrew Scott, M.D., FRACP, Lab Head, Tumor Targeting Lab, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Australia

   • What are the roadblocks to translation of concept to clinic?
   • What are the optimal preclinical studies required for commitment to clinical development?
   • How can academia and industry work together in antibody development?
   • What are the regulatory issues that impact on antibody development?
   • How can predictive biomarkers assist with development and trial design?
   • What is the optimal Phase I trial design to validate target / antibody construct?

TABLE: New Cancer Targets

Moderator: Mitchell Ho, Ph.D., Head, Antibody Therapy Section, Laboratory of Molecular Biology, National Cancer Institute, NIH

   • What are hot cancer targets for the next 10 years?
   • What are the cutting-edge technologies for target discovery?
   • How to validate new targets in the early stage of discovery?
   • How can academia and industry work together in target discovery?

TABLE: CTLA-4 Blockade for Melanoma

Moderator: Michael Postow, M.D., Medical Oncology Fellow, Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

   • What are the leading immunologic biomarkers associated with clinical outcomes?
   • What are the challenges in using response endpoints in assessing the potential for long-term patient benefit?
   • What is known about combining CTLA-4 blocking antibodies with other anti-cancer treatments such as chemotherapy, targeted therapy, other immunotherapy, and radiotherapy?
   • What are the expected toxicities and how are these best managed?

TABLE: Challenges and Emerging Solutions for Therapeutic Antibody Development

Moderator: Lei Zheng, M.D., Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Oncology and Surgery, Gastrointestinal Oncology Program, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

   • Target identification for therapeutic antibody development: from targeting tumor cells to targeting tumor microenvironment
   • Emerging platforms and technologies for molecular engineering of therapeutic antibodies
   • New formats of therapeutic antibodies: antibody-drug conjugates, bispecific antibodies, trispecific immunocytokines, etc.
   • Preclinical models for in vivo testing of anti-tumor activity of therapeutic antibodies
   • Mechanisms of action and resistance of therapeutic antibodies

TABLE: Antibody Based Targeting of Tumor Vasculature

Moderator: Bradley St. Croix, Ph.D., Tumor Angiogenesis Section, Mouse Cancer Genetics Program, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research

   • What are the key limitations of current anti-VEGF antibody therapy for cancer?
   • What constitutes an ideal tumor vasculature target for antibody therapy?
   • Are current tumor vascular targets suitable for targeting and, if not, what technologies could be used to find better targets?
   • Antibody efficacy depends on many factors including target specificity, affinity, neutralizing activity, ability to engage ADCC, PK, etc.
   • Which antibody characteristics are most important for effective targeting of tumor vasculature?

5:45 - 6:45 Welcoming Reception in Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing



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